30/11/08 (B476) Le journal de la Filbuste … Le cargo ukrainien qui transportait un important matériel de guerre, pourrait être libéré prochainement. Rien de neuf côté du Super Tanker pourtant frappé d’un ultimatum à la fin novembre. (5 dépêches en Français et en Anglais)

_________________________________ 5 CBC News (En Anglais)

Connexions canadiennes avec le monde de la piraterie. C’est un ancien salarié de la société canadienne de Gaz d’Ottawa qui dirige maintenant le Puntland. // Former Ottawa gas station operator rules home state of Somali pirates

Written by SLE

The president of Puntland for the past three years has been Mohamud Muse Hersi, a former Ottawa gas station operator.

There’s a Canadian connection to the ongoing piracy drama off the coast of Somalia.

Many of the pirates hijacking vessels in the region are based in an autonomous region called Puntland, beyond the control of what passes for a central government in Somalia.

The president of Puntland for the past three years has been Mohamud Muse Hersi, a former Ottawa gas station operator.

Hersi emigrated to Canada in the 1980s, bought a gas station and raised a family, but his clan connections to Somalia remained strong. When the elders of Puntland were looking for a new president in 2005, they chose Hersi.

There are about a dozen hijacked ships anchored off the Puntland coast at the moment, waiting as the pirates and shipowners haggle over ransom money.

Hersi’s critics accuse him and his ministers of taking bribes from the pirates to look the other way.

Ahmed Hussen, president of the Canadian Somali Congress, says he lacks evidence of such corruption but adds: “It would be inconceivable for all this piracy to be going on on the coast of Puntland without at least the knowledge, if not the collusion, of the Puntland government.”

Hersi vigorously denies the charge. As proof, he points to two successful counterattacks against the pirates mounted by Puntland’s coast guard.

Roger Middleton, an analyst at the London-based Royal Institute of International Affairs, says the two hijackings Hersi’s government interfered with involved cargos of direct economic interest to the regime.

“In one case, the cement that was in the ship belonged to one of the ministers in the government, so there was clearly a reason why they wanted to get involved,” he told CBC News.

Piracy off the Somali coast has more than doubled in 2008, with more than 60 ships attacked so far. (Canadian Press)If the Puntland government really wanted to stop the pirates, it would, Middleton says. But piracy has become the region’s most profitable industry. Middleton estimates the pirates will net about $50 million US this year while the Puntland government’s annual budget is just $20 million US.

Formally, Hersi is president of the Puntland State of Somalia, carved out of the collapsed country in 1998. It claims about a third of the national territory and calls itself “part of an anticipated Federal State of Somalia.”

Hussen of the Canadian Somali Congress says Puntland has been sliding toward the abyss under Hersi’s rule.

“I don’t think it’s reached the stage of anarchy yet, but it’s on the verge of that,” he told CBC News.

In a briefing paper on piracy published last month, Middleton made these points:

Piracy off the Somali coast has more than doubled in 2008, with more than 60 ships attacked so far.

Pirates are regularly demanding and getting million-dollar ransom payments and are becoming more aggressive and assertive.

Money from ransom is helping to pay for the war in Somalia, and the high level of piracy is making aid deliveries to the drought-stricken country more difficult and costly.

The danger and cost of piracy, including soaring insurance premiums, may force ships to avoid the Suez Canal route and sail around Africa, raising transportation costs and hence the price of oil and manufactured goods shipped to Europe and North America.

Piracy could cause a major environmental disaster if a tanker is sunk, run aground or set afire — and the pirates’ ever more powerful weaponry makes this increasingly likely.

_________________________________ 4 – JDD

Pirates-Somalie: Le navire ukrainien relâché et un espoir pour la libération des deux religieuses enlevées.

Le navire ukrainien qui transportait 33 chars et du matériel militaire a été relâché par les pirates somaliens dimanche après des négociations avec le propriétaire du bateau. “Ils ont conclu un accord, mais ils discutent encore des modalités de libération du bateau, de l’équipage et de la cargaison”, a précisé un représentant des autorités maritimes kényanes, qui a dit tout ignorer du paiement éventuel d’une rançon.

Par ailleurs, un haut responsable de la police du nord-est du Kenya a déclaré s’attendre à la libération lundi ou mardi des deux religieuses italiennes enlevées en territoire kényan limitrophe de la Somalie il y a trois semaines.

_________________________________ 3 – Le Vif (Be)

Somalie: les pirates font état d’un “accord” sur le cargo d’armes

Les pirates somaliens qui détiennent depuis deux mois un cargo ukrainien chargé d’armes ont affirmé dimanche à l’AFP qu’un “accord” avait été conclu avec les propriétaires du navire pour sa libération qui pourrait intervenir d’ici quatre jours, sans préciser le “montant payé”.

“Ce que je peux dire c’est qu’un accord a finalement été trouvé. Je ne peux pas vous dire le montant payé”, a déclaré Sugule Ali, porte-parole des pirates du Faina. “Le Faina pourrait être libéré après le paiement d’un” certain montant d’argent. C’est une question de temps et de conditions techniques avant que le bateau soit libéré”, a-t-il ajouté.

Les pirates avaient baissé leurs prétentions, fixées après la capture à 35 millions de dollars.

Le 25 novembre ils avaient exprimé leur accord pour une rançon de trois millions en échange du Faina, de la vingtaine de membres d’équipage et de sa cargaison, comprenant notamment 33 chars d’assaut T-72 de conception soviétique et environ 14.000 munitions. (MPA)

_________________________________ 2 – AFP en Anglais

Les pirates somaliens espèrent une sortie de crise favorable avec une réponse favorable des armateurs du Super Tanker à leur proposition de rançon. // Somali pirates hope for ‘favourable’ reply for Saudi ship ransom (Info lecteur)

Somali pirates demanding 25 million dollars for a Saudi super-tanker seized two weeks ago said Saturday they were hoping for a “favourable” reply as the deadline for paying the ransom loomed.

The pirates hijacked the 330-metre long Sirius Star on November 15 and have given the owners of the giant oil carrier up to Sunday to pay the ransom.

“Though the ultimatum for the payment of the 25 million dollars is about to expire, we are still expecting to get a favourable reply,” Mohammed Said, the leader of the group holding the Sirius Star, told AFP.

“We are securing the tanker as well as the Harardhere area. We don’t want anything bad to happen,” he said. Harardhere is the coastal village in northern Somalia off which the ship is being held.

“Negotiations continue but we don’t know when they will be finalised.”

In a recent interview, the chairman of Lloyd’s insurance said it was “highly likely” the owners of the Sirius Star would pay up.

Lord Peter Levene told Britain’s Channel Four News television: “At the end of the day there is no alternative, if you don’t want lives to be lost.”

The capture of the Sirius Star, carrying two million barrels of oil, sent shockwaves through the shipping world and prompted some companies to re-route via the Cape of Good Hope.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi on Friday called for tougher international action against the rampant piracy that has threatened to choke one of the world’s most important shipping routes.

Meles also claimed Ethiopia’s arch-foe Eritrea was backing the pirates who have defied foreign navies in the region and increased attacks on vessels in the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean.

“By directly and conspicuously supporting extremists in Somalia and exacerbating its woes, Eritrea is responsible for the rampant piracy in the region,” Meles said late Friday.

“It is of utmost importance that the international community does more to tackle piracy in the Gulf of Aden.”

Ethiopia’s foreign ministry said “the response of the international community has, until very recently, been far from the kind of concerted effort that the seriousness and the magnitude of the problem warranted.”

But many experts argue the piracy problem will never be resolved until there is an end to Somalia’s relentless fighting involving a myriad of clans, Islamist groups, as well as Ethiopian troops and Somali government forces.

Ethiopia and Eritrea blame each other for the Somali crisis, with Asmara accusing its rival of invasion when it sent in troops in 2006 and Addis Ababa blaming it for supporting the Islamists.

On Friday, Ethiopia announced its troops will withdraw from Somalia by the end of this year, ending an ill-fated two-year occupation but raising fears of a security vacuum in the war-ravaged country.

In the latest of a series of brazen attacks launched despite the presence of foreign navies in the region, pirates on Friday seized a Liberia-flagged oil and chemical tanker in the Gulf of Aden.

Three men initially thought to be crew jumped overboard and were fished out by a German helicopter and then brought aboard a French frigate escorting a Norwegian bulk carrier.

Anti-Piracy Maritime Security Services (APMSS) said the three were former British soldiers providing security for the MV Buscaglia.

The men “came under sustained and heavy attack from pirates with automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenades,” Nick Davis, the firm’s director, said in a statement.

They “sustained, non-lethal, resistance, denying the attackers’ access to the ship long enough for the ship’s operating crew to seek safety below decks and to summon assistance from coalition warships,” he added.

Undeterred by international pledges of tough action since the super-tanker was captured, the pirates have continued to roam Somalia’s waters and beyond, seizing half-a-dozen ships over the past two weeks.

_________________________________ 1 – AFP

Somalie: “accord” des pirates sur le cargo d’armes, pas de nouvelles du supertanker

Les pirates somaliens qui détiennent depuis deux mois un cargo ukrainien chargé d’armes ont affirmé dimanche qu’un “accord” avait été conclu avec les propriétaires du navire pour sa libération, qui pourrait intervenir selon eux d’ici quatre jours.

En revanche, l’ultimatum concernant le super-tanker saoudien Sirius Star arrivait à échéance dimanche sans avancée apparente dans les négociations sur la rançon de 25 millions de dollars exigée pour sa libération et celle des 25 membres d’équipage.

La prise en septembre du cargo ukrainien, le Faina, avait constitué un coup exceptionnel pour les pirates: il est chargé de 33 chars d’assaut T-72 de conception soviétique et d’environ 14.000 munitions, officiellement destinés au Kenya quoique cette destination soit très controversée.

Les pirates avaient baissé leurs prétentions fixées après la capture à 35 millions de dollars. Le 25 novembre, ils avaient exprimé leur accord pour une rançon de trois millions en échange du navire, de la vingtaine de membres d’équipage et de sa cargaison.

“Ce que je peux dire c’est qu’un accord a finalement été trouvé. Je ne peux pas vous dire le montant payé”, a déclaré à l’AFP dimanche Sugule Ali, porte-parole des pirates du Faina.

“Le Faina pourrait être libéré après le paiement d’un certain montant. C’est une question de temps et de conditions techniques avant que le bateau soit libéré”, a-t-il ajouté.

Il a précisé qu’un plan de libération sur six jours, dont deux déjà passés dimanche, avait été établi pour permettre aux pirates de recevoir la rançon sans risquer d’être interceptés.

“D’ici quatre jours, nous devrons avoir quitté (le Faina), et nous nous préparons à débarquer nos éléments en sécurité”, a indiqué Sugule Ali. “Nos éléments sont très fatigués, et l’équipage également. Nous voulons tous que la question soit réglée”.

La situation semblait en revanche bloquée pour le Sirius Star. Aucun contact n’a pu être établi dimanche avec les pirates, jour de l’expiration de l’ultimatum pour la remise des 25 millions de dollars qu’ils exigent.

Samedi, Mohamed Said, porte-parole des pirates qui détiennent le Sirius Star depuis le 15 novembre, avait indiqué à l’AFP que les négociations se poursuivaient mais qu’il “ne savait pas quand elles (seraient) finalisées”. Sans exclure toutefois une prolongation de l’ultimatum.

“Même si l’ultimatum pour le paiement des 25 millions de dollars est près d’expirer, nous espérons toujours une réponse favorable”, avait-il dit.

Dans une interview récente, le patron de la compagnie d’assurance Lloyd’s a estimé qu’il y avait “de grandes chances” que les propriétaires du superpétrolier payent la rançon, n’ayant “pas d’autre alternative pour préserver des vies”.

Les pirates somaliens ont capturé le Sirius Star, 330 mètres de long, le 15 novembre avec ses 25 membres d’équipage, et un chargement de 300.000 tonnes de pétrole. C’est la prise la plus spectaculaire de ces écumeurs des mers, qui ont attaqué une centaine de bateaux depuis le début de l’année.

Vendredi, un chimiquier battant pavillon libérien, le Biscaglia, a été attaqué et capturé dans le Golfe d’Aden par un groupe de six pirates, en dépit de la présence à bord de trois agents d’une compagnie privée de sécurité britannique qui ont réussi à s’échapper.

Les attaques de pirates se poursuivent malgré la présence dans la zone d’une coalition internationale censée dissuader ce genre d’attaques sur l’une des routes maritimes les plus dangereuses au monde, mais aussi les plus stratégiques notamment pour les hydrocarbures.