25/10/08 (B471) Press TV Aux termes d’un accord négocié à Addis Abeba, les Ethiopiens vont recevoir une aide financière et militaire des Nations Unies pour poursuivre leurs actions en Somalie. UN to fund Ethiopians in Somalia (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

Zenawi has been reportedly given promises of UN financial and military support.

The UN has reportedly agreed to provide Ethiopia with financial and military support in the country’s battle against Somali insurgents.

The agreement is a result of negotiations between Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zanawi and UN Deputy Secretary-General Asha-Rose Migiro in the Ethiopian capital Adis Ababa, sources in Somalia’s presidential palace told Press TV.

The deal aims at curbing violence and facilitating counterinsurgency activities in Somalia, the sources added.

In 2006, Ethiopian soldiers entered Somalia to back the country’s embattled Transitional Federal Government (TFG). Ever since, Somalis have been the casualty of the troops’ unceasing struggle against the insurgents.

The agreement was reportedly reached between Zenawi and UN Deputy Secretary-General, Asha-Rose Migiro.

The death toll on the side of Somalis was so extensive that it prompted the Ethiopian authorities to consider withdrawal. Last week, Zenawi said poor ‘commitment’ on the part of the Somali government would leave Ethiopia no choice but to pull the forces out of Somalia.

Ten Ethiopians were said to have been killed during the their most recent engagement with the insurgents in the town of Bardale southeast of the capital Mogadishu. The confrontation also claimed 30 Somali soldiers.

The accommodation, however, marks a coup for the Ethiopian side following reports of Adis Ababa’s abortive attempts at seeking support from the European Union.

23/10/08 (B470-B) Press TV. Les navires de guerre de l’OTAN vont bientôt être en mesure d’escorter les bateaux de commerce pour les protéger des attaques des pirates. // NATO warships heading to Somalia (En Anglais – Info lectrice)

NATO warships will start to escort aid cargos to Somalia in a bid to stem mounting piracy in the waters off the Horn of Africa.

“In a few days, operations will begin,” chief NATO spokesman James Appathurai told reporters in Brussels, explaining “the operational plan and the rules of engagement should be agreed and finalized in the next day or two.”

NATO frigates and destroyers are en route to the area where more than 30 ships have fallen victim to increasing acts of piracy this year, he said.

Appathurai said the warships and their crews would have ‘a full range of self defense’ measures, including the use of force. Captured pirates would be dealt with under the rules of the nation that each ship involved belongs to, he added.

The spokesman acknowledged the alliance would, however, have a complicated task ahead as it would have to deal with ‘a host of pirates’ who are not immediately identifiable.

Vessels will also help look after UN World Food Program (WFP) aid shipments to Somalia, planned to go under Dutch escort on Thursday, until the European Union can launch its own operation later this year.

The dangerous Somali waters have become a hotbed for acts of piracy, especially in the north where an adjacent maritime route runs to the Suez Canal.

The pirates keep seizing ships and their crews, some times for weeks, demanding large ransoms from governments or owners.

On October 9, the EU announced its mission, led by Vice-Admiral Philip Jones, would be run from a headquarters at Northwood, north of London.

Appathurai said the presence of the ships — from Belgium, Cyprus, France, Germany, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and possibly Britain– is hoped to deter would-be pirates, saying vessels from India and Russia would also join the armada.

“There will be a number of very competent and very effective military ships coordinating with each other … to provide presence, to provide deterrence and where necessary and possible to intervene to prevent acts of piracy,” he said.

23/10/08 (B470-B) NATO warships heading to Somalia Thu, 23 Oct 2008 07:18:39 GMT

NATO warships will start to escort aid cargos to Somalia in a bid to stem mounting piracy in the waters off the Horn of Africa.

"In a few days, operations will begin," chief NATO spokesman James Appathurai told reporters in Brussels, explaining "the operational plan and the rules of engagement should be agreed and finalized in the next day or two."

NATO frigates and destroyers are en route to the area where more than 30 ships have fallen victim to increasing acts of piracy this year, he said.

Appathurai said the warships and their crews would have ‘a full range of self defense’ measures, including the use of force. Captured pirates would be dealt with under the rules of the nation that each ship involved belongs to, he added.

The spokesman acknowledged the alliance would, however, have a complicated task ahead as it would have to deal with ‘a host of pirates’ who are not immediately identifiable.

Vessels will also help look after UN World Food Program (WFP) aid shipments to Somalia, planned to go under Dutch escort on Thursday, until the European Union can launch its own operation later this year.

The dangerous Somali waters have become a hotbed for acts of piracy, especially in the north where an adjacent maritime route runs to the Suez Canal.

The pirates keep seizing ships and their crews, some times for weeks, demanding large ransoms from governments or owners.

On October 9, the EU announced its mission, led by Vice-Admiral Philip Jones, would be run from a headquarters at Northwood, north of London.

Appathurai said the presence of the ships — from Belgium, Cyprus, France, Germany, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and possibly Britain– is hoped to deter would-be pirates, saying vessels from India and Russia would also join the armada.

"There will be a number of very competent and very effective military ships coordinating with each other … to provide presence, to provide deterrence and where necessary and possible to intervene to prevent acts of piracy," he said.

23/10/08 (B470-B) Press TV Un représentant de l’opposition affirme que des Groupes d’oppositions pourraient signer bientôt des accords de paix avec le GNT. // Somali opposition, TFG to sign peace deal (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

Somalia’s opposition leader says the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) and the opposition groups are to sign a peace deal soon.

Sheikh Sharif Sheikh Ahmed told reporters in Yemen that the peace agreement would be signed in Saudi Arabia, a Press TV correspondent reported.

“We should save our people, our country, and stop daily violence,” Sheikh Ahmed said.

He also proposed the idea of power sharing saying that if the opposition and TFG work together, they can work toward solving the problems Somalia faces.

“Power sharing is very important, we want our share in the government,” said the opposition leader, adding, “We have the right to ask for a Unity Government.”

Sheikh Ahmed urged the opposition groups in Somalia to unite and form a single opposition standing for one cause. He expressed hope that foreign forces would leave the country in the near future.

Somalia has been without an effective central government since the Horn of Africa nation’s dictator Siad Barre was overthrown in 1991. In 2006, Ethiopia sent in troops to back Somalia’s Transitional Federal Government (TFG).

The ongoing violence in Somalia has resulted in the death and displacement of countless civilians.

20/10/08 (B470-B) Les informations contradictoires à ce sujet, se succèdent. Aujourd’hui Press TV, après des informations inverses attribuées au GNT, reprend les propos du Premier ministre somalien qui se déclare satisfait d’avoir à accueillir des batiments de guerre étrangers dans les eaux somaliennes pour lutter contre la piraterie …// Somalia welcomes foreign warships. (Info lectrice – En Anglais)

Somalia’s prime minister welcomes foreign warships to fight piracy in Somali waters in a bid to scrap soaring piracy in the Horn of Africa.

In a news conference in the capital Mogadishu on Sunday, Somali Prime Minister Nur Hassan Hussein stated that foreign forces, which include NATO and Russian warships, are welcome to fight rampant piracy in his country’s territorial waters.

"The warships from NATO and other countries are welcome to fight piracy in our coast. They have our permission because they are responding to our request to the United Nations to help us deal with the menace," Hussein told reporters.

Somali pirates

He also sought to allay concerns expressed by some Somali officials that that a number of of the warships may be involved in illegal activities. The Somali Premier noted that in that event the issue will be dealt with separately.

NATO along with Russia has sent seven warships to Somali territorial waters in order to fight soaring piracy in the Horn of Africa which is one of the most dangerous waterways in the world.

More than 60 ships have been attacked by Somali pirates this year alone, compared with about half that in 2007.

18/10/08 (B470) PRESS TV : un travailleur humanitaire somalien visé par trois tireurs, meurt sur le chemin de l’hôpital ! // Somali UN aid worker shot dead (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

A Somali man working for the United Nations World Food Program (WFD) has been shot dead in the southern region of Lower Shabelle.

Three armed men gunned down a UN aid worker, identified by a UN source as Abdinasir Aden Muse, while he was leaving a mosque in the town of Merka on Friday, witnesses told Press TV correspondent.

He died on the way to hospital, our correspondent said.

The incident comes about two weeks after an Italian aid worker was injured when his vehicle hit a roadside bomb in Merka.

UN workers in Somalia have been the target of increasing attacks this year. Friday’s killing brought to 13 the number of aid workers killed in Somalia this year.

15/10/08 (B469-B) Press TV / Des violences en Somalie causent la mort de 41 personnes. // Somali violence leaves 41 dead (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

Chaos and violence dominates conflict-torn Somalia

At least 41 people, including Ethiopian soldiers have been killed in heavy clashes, as violence continues to dominate war-torn Somalia.

In the town of Baidoa, 250 kilometers southeast the capital Mogadishu, heavily armed insurgents fired mortars at two military bases in the region, killing at least 20 Ethiopian soldiers and seriously injuring 35 others, Press TV correspondent in Somalia reported on Wednesday.

The Ethiopians reacted by shelling residential areas, which left at least 11 civilians dead.

Meanwhile, early in the morning, an ambush attack on another military base in the same town left at least 10 Somali government soldiers dead and a dozen others injured.

Somalia has been plagued by almost uninterrupted civil unrest after the 1991 toppling of dictator Mohammed Siad Barre and has had no effective central rule ever since.

Chaos and violence dominates the East African country with an especially fierce insurgency going on in Mogadishu.

14/10/08 (B469-B) Press TV // Plus de 40 soldats éthiopiens tués après que leurs véhicules aient sauté sur des bombes. // Somali clashes leave scores killed (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

More than 40 Ethiopian soldiers are killed after their vehicle hit a landmine near Bardale, a town 350 km from the Somali capital, Mogadishu.

The military convoy was heading towards Mogadishu when it was attacked by the military wing of the Union of the Islamic Courts (UIC), al-Shabaab, Press TV correspondent reported on Monday.

In another incident, 10 Ethiopian troops as well as many more civilians were killed after clashes erupted near the Ethiopian Base of Pasta in Heliwaa District in North Mogadishu, the report said.

Hundreds of people have fled their homes as mortars are fired and heavy fighting goes on in the region.

The UN- backed African Union Mission to Somalia, known as AMISOM was deployed in March 2007 to replace Ethiopian troops who invaded Somalia in 2006 in an attempt to back the country’s Transitional Federal Government. But they failed to withdraw and have been blamed for the deaths of thousands of civilian and countless human rights violations in the Horn of Africa nation.