04/09/08 (B463-B) Shabelle. Selon les déclarations d’un parlementaire somalien, les Ethiopiens sont en train de coloniser son pays. Somali MP says Ethiopia “colonizes Somalia” (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

One of Somalia’s legislative body members has announced that Ethiopia laid claims to Somalia.

Reacting on the transitional government’s remarks regarding capturing of Kismayo town from the islamists Osman Elmi Boqore has told Shabelle that Ethiopia dictated for the government to recapture Kismayo to make possible that Ethiopian troops to move out to the town that has significant port.

“Ethiopia wants to seize where ever it interests in Somalia to acquire supplementary economic because Ethiopia is landlocked, Somalis seized the town only Somalis can also recapture “no Ethiopians” ” Boqore said.

Regarding on the agreement signed by the president and the prime minister in Ethiopia Boqre has pointed out that it was “erroneous” accord since they didn’t in person agreed as he put it.

“They have been read out for what they agreed, they have to agree as leaders of nation” Boqore further said.

It’s the first kind or speech from Somali MP who stated that Ethiopia seized Somalia and take possession of.

04/09/08 (B463-B) Shabelle / Discussion au Parlement sur les termes de l’accord signé à Addis Abeba entre le Président du GNT et son premier Ministre. MPs receive President, PM’s agreement in Ethiopia articles (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

The legislative body members have been distributed for today the agreement signed by Somali president and the premier in Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.

In a meeting they held at ADC (parliament centre) in Baidoa town the MPs had to take delivery of the piece of writings of the agreement.

The article are including:-


The resigned ministers will be included originally in the cabinet

– The three ministers appointed by the PM approved by the president.

The C.E.O. of today’s session Osman Elmi Boqore has informed to the MPs to read out the article and to give their views.

The second phase of the meeting will take place on Thursday.

Festering disagreement between the two senior Somali leaders escalated last month after Hussein sacked the mayor of Mogadishu, a close ally of the president, who reinstated the mayor in a decree revoking the prime minister’s decision as unconstitutional.

Some pro-president ministers in the cabinet of Hussein’s government resigned, accusing the premier of incompetence and misuse of state funds.

The two leaders are expected to brief the Somali national parliament Thursday about their agreement, the content of which has not been officially released.

Lawmakers have also debated and voted No-confidence vote against PM Nor Adde’s government it survived.

President Abdullahi Yusuf and Prime Minister Nur Hassan Hussein have been squabbling for weeks, since Hussein fired a key ally of the president who was ally to the president.

03/09/08 (B463) Shabelle / 51 soldats, sous uniforme des troupes gouvernementales, soupçonnés de vols contre des civils, ont été arrêtés à l’Ouest de Mogadiscio.Brigand soldiers arrested west of Mogadishu (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

The commandment of west of Mogadishu’s police force has affirmed that they have detained up to 5l soldiers those have been depriving the civilians in Madina neighborhood in Mogadishu, commander said.

The police station commander Abdi Mohamed “Takow” told Shabelle that the soldiers were in the dress of the Gov soldiers at the time they were held while they were searching for civilian woman later on Tuesday.

“They will be brought before the justice” Takow said.

He owned up that TFG soldiers those make shoplifting acts in the city.

Mogadishu residents have accused the government troops of robbing their properties with a gun point.

03/09/08 (B463) Shabelle / Le Président somalien affirme que des éléments prouvent que les accords de Djibouti, entre le Gouvernement et l’ARS, ont été violés – Somali president says Djibouti agreement “violated” (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

Somalia’s transitional government Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed has announced that there are elements violated the agreement of Djibouti that jointly signed by his Gov and the alliance for the reliberaion of Somalia, the major opposition group.

“There are groups those geared up for fight, disgusted peace, they rejected the last inclusive agreement of Djibouti” Yusuf said in a news conference he held in Mogadishu.

He added that Kismayo town has been seized by the islamists saying that no group can have authority to capture city except “the government”

“We will not persist to endure the control of Kismayo by the rebels, we will recapture it in any case we are capable of” the president said.

Elsewhere the reconciliation minister of the transitional government Abdirisaq Ashkir on his side said that the islamists have invaded Kismayo by mistake.

“The government will seize Kismayo also will set up hard-hitting administration there as soon as possible” Ashkir said in a news conference in Mogadishu.

He added that Kismayo town’s attack by the islamists would chip away at the agreement signed in Djibouti.

He elsewhere asked the ARS’s opposition group based in Djibouti to reach the aid organization’s food aids to the in need population in the country.

Interim Somali President Abdullahi Yusuf has long maintained that Kismayo is not in the hands of the Ethiopian-backed transitional government.

There are no Ethiopian forces present in Kismayo and the Jubba regions as a whole, although clan militias there claim they are part of the government.

Kismayo airport is intact and the city boasts one of only four sea ports in Somalia, and two of these are in northern breakaway regions of the country which, like the SRRC, do not recognise the authority of the TNG.

The other port in the south is in Mogadishu and has not been operational since 1995.

Most maritime trade is conducted 100 kilometers (60 miles) south of the capital in Merka, but this town has no harbour or port facilities so ships have to unload to small boats which are then unloaded manually from the beach.

Whoever controls Kismayo controls imports of much food and electronic goods and exports of bananas and charcoal, among other merchandise and commodities.

Morgan whose militias have been ousted from the town by the islamists had been preparing for this latest offensive for more than a year but the campaign only began in earnest with the formation of the SRRC and the support that brought from other forces opposed to the government.

Somalia has been at war since 1991, when clan-based militias ousted Siad Barre, a socialist dictator, and then fought for power among themselves.

The conflict is complicated by clan loyalties and the involvement of archenemies Eritrea and Ethiopia, who both back opposite sides in the fighting.

The last UN peacekeeping force in Somalia included American troops who arrived in 1992 and tried to arrest warlords and create a government.

The US involvement ended in October 1993, when fighters shot down a US Army Black Hawk helicopter during a battle that killed 18 American soldiers.

Since then, Ethiopian troops have helped Somalia’s fragile transitional government push the Islamists from power in Mogadishu and much of the south, but failed to establish security or improve living standards.

03/09/08 (B463) Shabelle / Le principal groupe somalien d’opposition, co-signataire des récents accords de Djibouti, l’ARS contedit le Président du GNT, lorsqu’il affirme être en mesure de reprendre le port de Kismayo aux islamistes. ARS says TFG incapable to seize Kismayo (En Anglais – Info lectrice)

The major Somalia’s opposition group, the alliance for the reliberation of Somalia the faction based Asmara has disagreed with Somali president’s remarks on the recapture of Kismayo town from the islamists.

One of the group’s officials Abduqadir Dhaqane has stated that president Yusuf’s comments on the capture of Kismayo town from the islamist groups those have driven out pro-government’s militias.

“Let alone them to seize Kismayo they cannot defend their feeble positions” Dhaqane said.

Speaking to Shabelle radio from Somalia’s lower Jubba region he added that the islamist fighters have forced out Barre Hirale (Somali MP) and his militiamen.

He further said that the transitional government doesn’t also in charge of Baidoa town the seat of Somali parliament and the only street the Government officials pass of Maka Almukarramah.

Asked about the government’s threats on the recapture of Kismayo he said that was “past phony remarks”

ARS’s comments come following Somalia’s transitional government Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed has announced that there are elements violated the agreement of Djibouti that jointly signed by his Gov and the alliance for the reliberaion of Somalia, the major opposition group.

“There are groups those geared up for fight, disgusted peace, they rejected the last inclusive agreement of Djibouti” Yusuf said in a news conference he held in Mogadishu.

He added that Kismayo town has been seized by the islamists saying that no group can have authority to capture city except “the government”

“We will not persist to endure the control of Kismayo by the rebels, we will recapture it in any case we are capable of” the president said.

Elsewhere the reconciliation minister of the transitional government Abdirisaq Ashkir on his side said that the islamists have invaded Kismayo by mistake.

“The government will seize Kismayo also will set up hard-hitting administration there as soon as possible” Ashkir said in a news conference in Mogadishu.

He added that Kismayo town’s attack by the islamists would chip away at the agreement signed in Djibouti.

He elsewhere asked the ARS’s opposition group based in Djibouti to reach the aid organization’s food aids to the in need population in the country.

Kismayo, 500 kilometres (300 miles) south of the capital Mogadishu.

Interim Somali President Abdullahi Yusuf has long maintained that Kismayo is not in the hands of the Ethiopian-backed transitional government.

There are no Ethiopian forces present in Kismayo and the Jubba regions as a whole, although clan militias there claim they are part of the government.

Somalia has been at war since 1991, when clan-based militias ousted Siad Barre, a socialist dictator, and then fought for power among themselves.

The conflict is complicated by clan loyalties and the involvement of archenemies Eritrea and Ethiopia, who both back opposite sides in the fighting.

01/09/08 (B463) Shabelle / L’Union européenne va payer pour la mise en oeuvre de l’accord de Djibouti pour le règlement de la crise somalienne. EU pays for Djibouti agreement’s achievement.

_______________________________ Note de l’ARDHD

Encore une fois bravo !

Bravo à l’Union européenne. Financer un accord symbolique et sans véritable contenu, qui n’a rien résolu, à en juger par l’augmentation du nombre des accrochages journaliers et par le nombre des morts dans les différents camps, ça c’est du courage ! Pardon, de l’inconscience !

Mais si l’Union européenne déborde d’argent au point de le jeter par les fenêtres, qu’elle le distribue à toutes celles et tous ceux qui en ont vraiment besoin au motif qu’ils sont les victimes des bénéficiaires choisis par l’U.E. L’historique laissant penser que ces derniers le détourneront probablement pour leur profit personnel et pour développer des activités « spéciales » et pas toujours « recommandables ».

Pas de panique toutefois, car cette manne européenne ne sera pas perdue pour tout le monde, même si l’usage est loin de l’objectif recherché. Peut-être sera-t-elle même utilisée pour acquérir des armes … et des propriétés à l’étranger ?

Le montant de la rétrocession occulte que Guelleh pourrait avoir imposé aux destinataires de l’enveloppe européenne pour ses bons services (organisation de la conférence, mise à disposition de salles, logistique, protection, …) n’a pas été dévoilé publiquement …
_______________________________________________________

Commission welcomes signing of agreement between the Transitional Federal Government and the Alliance for the Re-liberation of Somalia

Louis Michel, European Commissioner for Development and Humanitarian Aid, welcomes the agreement between the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) and the Alliance for the Re-liberation of Somalia, concluded on 19th August, reiterating the support expressed by the French Presidency of the European Union.

Commissioner Michel remarked: « The parties to the Agreement have acted in a spirit of commitment and compromise, and of courage. I trust that its signature marks a significant step forward towards that reconciliation, and towards peace. As the most concrete and immediate confirmation of that progress, I call upon all parties to fully respect the cessation of armed conflict within 30 days. This is a unique opportunity for peace and stability in Somalia which has to be seized for the benefit of Somalia and to end the long suffering of its civilian population. »

And he added: « The Chairman of the Commission of the African Union, Mr Jean Ping, has rightly called for support from the international community to sustain the current momentum towards peace. The Commission for its part will continue to do all in its powers – along with the United Nations and with the rest of the international community – to support the process of continued political reconciliation in Somalia. »

In March 2008, the Transitional Federal Government of Somalia (TFG) presented its reconciliation strategy to achieve peace and stability. This strategy aims at promoting peace-building at the community level and proposed reconciliation between the TFG and the opposition based within and outside Somalia.

One major step in the implementation of this strategy was the political agreement reached in Djibouti on 9 June under the auspices of the UN between the Alliance for the Re-liberation of Somalia and the TFG[1], which has now been formally signed. The agreement provides for:

* Cessation of hostilities by both parties for an initial period of 90 days, starting 30 days from the signing of the agreement.

* The submission of a joint request to the UN Security Council to authorise and deploy an international stabilisation force.

* The withdrawal of the Ethiopian troops, following the deployment of a sufficient number of UN forces.

* The ARS to dissociate itself from any armed groups or individuals that do not adhere to the terms of the Agreement.

30/08/08 (B463) Shabelle / La violence augmente le nombre des réfugiés qui entrent au Kenya – Sharp increase in number of refugees entering Kenya (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

Instability in southern Somalia has led to a sharp increase in the number of refugees entering Kenya.

At least 25,000 Somali refugees have arrived in Kenya since the beginning of the year to join 130,000 others living in refugee camps since 1991 in the arid Dadaab area in the northeastern province, said officials

There are only a handful of wells to provide water, food is carefully rationed by the World Food Programme, and most people live in flimsy huts made from bits of twig bound together with string and covered in plastic sheeting from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The land is flat, and the shrubs are almost exclusively thorn bushes with spines as long and hard as nails.

And yet still the Somalis come, at a rate of at least 200 a day.

Those thronging the fence are hoping to jump the queue for registration as refugees – a status that gives them a fighting chance at a relatively safe and stable life denied to them at home in Somalia.

Bitter fighting

Take Dahawa Mohammed Noor. Back home in Mogadishu, she had a good life as a wife, a teacher and a mother of nine.

But the fighting between the Islamist insurgents on the one hand and Ethiopian forces backing the Transitional Federal Government on the other, has grown ever more bitter over the past few months.

Dahawa and her family managed, but only just.

She and her husband struggled to keep their children fed as the cost of food more than trebled over the past six months.

But Dahawa and her family were determined to stay – Mogadishu was their home, after all.

Then the fighting drifted towards their corner of the city.

In one bloody, terrifying night, Dahawa said soldiers raided their neighbourhood.

With tears streaming down her face, she was unable to explain exactly what happened, except that her husband and five of her children were all killed.

With the surviving members of her family, Dahawa fled Mogadishu, and spent three weeks trekking and hitching rides through Somalia’s western desert to the Kenyan border and the relative security of Dadaab.

Dahawa’s story is tragic, but it is hardly unusual.

Bandit culture

Bloodshed, drought and starvation are all contributing to what amounts to a perfect storm for aid agencies.

A UN analysis of food security in Somalia found 3.25 million people desperately in need of humanitarian support – a figure 77% higher than their estimates at the beginning of the year, and one which represents 43% of the entire population.

The civil war lies at the heart of the crisis. I’m telling the Somalis ‘enough, enough’ – 18 years (they’ve been at war) and I think it’s the right time now that they sit together

The escalating battles between the mosaic of factions and clans have forced hundreds of thousands of people from their homes.

They have also created a culture of banditry and piracy that makes it all but impossible for aid agencies to deliver food, medicines or shelter to large parts of the country.

The UN describes the current security situation as the worst since the conflict began 17 years ago.

The violence has also contributed to an economic crisis made worse by the uncontrolled printing of cash to fund the war.

Together with soaring prices for imported fuel and food, the surplus of Somali shillings has triggered hyperinflation that has forced the cost of food up 700% in the past year.

That, in turn, has created a new class of urban poor, unable to feed themselves.

And on top of it all, a drought – now in its fourth year – has all but destroyed crops and livestock across much of the south.

Diplomatic frustration

For the UN Secretary General’s Humanitarian Envoy, Abdul Aziz Arrukban, the situation is exasperating.

The number of refugees is expected to surge in the coming months

He has just completed a tour of the region, including a brief visit to the town of Wajid in the south of Somalia.

On a tour through the Dadaab refugee centre, the Saudi-born diplomat waved his hands in frustration.

« In the market (in Wajid), I picked up an egg, and I asked how much it was. Do you know that egg cost 20 US cents? » Mr Arrukban asks.

« That is more than five times what it cost six months ago. That’s just too much, » he continues. « How can these people pay for that? It’s impossible. »

Mr Arrukban’s job is to facilitate the humanitarian response to the crisis, but he was also quick to admit that it is just a band-aid.

« I’m telling the Somalis ‘enough, enough’ – 18 years (they’ve been at war) and I think it’s the right time now that they sit together, » he says.

« They must figure out some way to find peace because building more camps (like Dadaab) is not the solution, » he adds.

That prospect appears a long way off.

The UNHCR says while the daily numbers of refugees now arriving in Dadaab are at an all-time high, they expect them to surge still further over the coming weeks and months.

30/08/08 (B463) Shabelle / L’Ethiopie libère 30 somalien âgés qui avaient été incarcérés dans des quartiers haute sécurité, après l’assassinat d’un notable. Des femmes et des enfants ont aussi été incarcérés / After 4 months in jail Ethiopia Gov frees Somali elders (En Anglais – Info lecteur)

More than 30 Somali elders those have been in Ethiopian top-security prisons for more than four months they’ve regained their freedom on Friday night.

The elders have been detained from Yamarugley locale in the Somali region of Ethiopia after a well-known elder was killed in the region.

The Ethiopian troops have also detained the elders with children and women those were all pastoralists were full of activity with their country side works at the time they were put in jail by Ethiopian troops.

One of the freed elders Muse Abdulahi Farah told Shabelle that he was at ease to regain his freedom.

“Glory to God in the highest I am now free” Muse said.

He added that they had encountered many difficulties in the prison including beating and threats.

One female and child were include those have been freed by Ethiopian government.

The largest trouncing were encountered by several detainees from same family whose their animal stocks have been disregarded.

The region covers much of the traditional territory of Ogaden and it formed a large part of the pre-1995 province of Hararghe.

The region has a very high Somali population, and since Ethiopia conquered this region till present there is an internal resistance to remove Ethiopian rule.in the past has been tried to free as part of a Greater Somalia. In the 1970s, Somalia invaded Ethiopia in support of local Somali rebels, particularly during the Ogaden War,was defeated. .

The main Zones of the region are:-

Zones
Afder Zone
Degehabur Zone
Fiq Zone
Gode Zone
Jijiga Zone
Korahe Zone
Liben Zone
Shinile Zone
Werder Zone

This region lies in SE Ethiopia, bordering on Somalia and Kenya. It is an arid region, inhabited by Somali pastoral nomads. Upon the scramble and partition of Africa in 1884 by the Europeans, the region remained given to Menelik II of Ethiopia during 1891-97, but the territory was totally engulfed in 1954. The region has been in wars, cyclic droughts and total devastation since then, but mostly since 1960 up to now and State policies met with varying levels of resistance. The people of the region are naturally peaceful and where never allowed to exercise their right for self-determination, but rather subjected to longstanding hidden-sufferings and abuses by ruthless successive Ethiopian governments.

The only sign of other Ethiopians present or living in this region is the presence of huge military garrisons, which are there only for repression and destruction of lives, both humans and animals. The Ethiopian populations is 64 million and are living in the 9 regions of Ethiopia, Oromonia is the largest region in Ethiopia, while the Somali region is the second. Ethiopia is considered by many experts to be the poorest country on earth, yet the present Ethiopian government has currently over 350,000 soldiers, the largest army in black Africa, and about 100,000 of them are in the Somali region, which is populated by 4-5 million Somalis, that is 8% of the Ethiopian population.

The presence in our region by this unjustified huge army tells us more about the plight of our people. Successive Ethiopian governments have not allowed the Somalis to join the army, police and security services, except for some local notorious spies who work with the Ethiopian soldiers by spying only on Somalis, and that kind of employment remains to be the most lucrative work in our region! Forced conscription of young Somalis to join the army and fight in other troubled regions of Ethiopia has been quite common for the last century. More than 20,000 Somalis where forced against their will and participated in the Ethio-Eritrean fighting of 1998-2000.

The majority of them, about 16,000, remained unaccounted for to this day, while those who survived where ordered to go back to their agonized families without being paid any salary for the three years that they were fighting at the front lines.

The Tigray Peoples Liberation Front (TPLF) soldiers in the region are themselves the courts, judges, prosecutors, executioners, the police and you name it…!!!, that is to say all the powers in the region are in their hands. They kill people indiscriminately at their own will, without the rule of law, since they have the green lights to do so unchecked from those in Addis Abeba. Every aspect of decent human life remains neglected in this region and the people in this unfortunate region lack the minimum basic standards of human beings in the 21st century such as follows:

1. The Somalis remain denied of their rights to basic education. There are elementary schools and several high schools, which function irregularly. The many universities and colleges in Ethiopia very rarely accept Somali students to study in them. Only about 1-2% of our people can speak Amharic, which is the official language of Ethiopia, while 100% of them speak native Somali language.

2. There are no proper hospitals or pharmacies but only some under-staffed health centers. More than 95% of the people do not have access to health services, while it is 47% for the rest of Ethiopians. The main access to heath services in the region remains to be that of the traditional healers, local herbal-medicine and traditional birth attendants.

3. There is no electricity any where in the region and most of the people in the region have never seen a Television or Cinemas.

4. No communications like postal services, and most of the people have not seen or used up to now telephones, faxes etc., because there aren’t any in the region.

5. There are no roads in the region except dirty dusty ones and trails created by the nomads and their herds.

6. There is no clean drinking tape water. People, their herds and other wild animals share what ever they find in dirty wells. In most of the dry Seasons the Ethiopian soldiers will occupy these wells and people have to bribe them by giving them some of their herds, because that is the only way they can get water and survive in the harsh dry seasons.

7. There isn’t any kind of major developmental project in the whole region, but only few minor ones that are implemented by TPLF supporters from Tigray region, while local Somalis are not allowed to be contractors in their own region.

8. There is no regular farming activities in this region, because traditionally the bandit Ethiopian soldiers will collect forcefully the harvested crops and this has discouraged the people of the region to farm.

9. No proper buildings in the so called “shanty towns” and villages of the region and no public health services, including proper waste disposal system. Instead of schools, one will notice the hundreds of prisons that are in all over the region including even the rural villages. These awful prisons have horrendous and scary underground cells not suitable at all for humans or animals. However, true people remain herded in these man made caves!

10. There are no commercial civilian airports or airlines that serve in the region, but many military airports as well as their fighter jet planes, which participate actively and regularly in the oppression and destruction of the people and their properties.

11. Ethiopian-Somalis are denied of their freedom of mobility, and do not travel freely to other regions and cities of Ethiopia. Only those with permission from the TPLF-soldiers who are occupying the Somali region illegally can travel.

12. This region has no civilian courts, judges and lawyers and Ethiopian governments, especially the present one, have been implementing a policy of targeted assassinations, unjustified imprisonment and different tactics of intimidations to the Somali intellectuals who have been forced again and again to abandon and flee their country by Ethiopian regimes, since they understand that knowledge is power.

13. All the mass media belongs to the Ethiopian government. There are not any private mass media, like radios, journals and Televisions in the Somali region.

14. There aren’t veterinary doctors or veterinary services for the millions of livestock like camels, cattle, sheep, horses, donkeys, chicken and goats in the region, an activity in which more than 70% of the people are involved and upon which they survive on. Lack of Veterinary services, recurrent droughts and diseases have contributed to the gradually decline in the numbers of the livestock herds.

15. Freedom of expression of speech, mass assembly and peaceful protest where not allowed in our region for over a century up to the present day.

16. The government doesn’t allow the local Somalis to have NGO’s and has discouraged International NGO’S as well as Ethiopian and international journalists to visit and write about our problems by telling them that the region was not peaceful and that the government will not be responsible for their security. Successive Ethiopian governments were able to keep secret of whatever was happening in our region and that is why this region was isolated or “closed” in the past and remains so until now from the rest of World.

17. The federal government has marginalized us and does not employ Somalis in its different ministries and agencies in Addis Abeba as well as elsewhere. There is one Somali among the whole staff of the Ethiopian Embassies and Consulates in all over the World, and one out of the 45 members of the Ethiopian cabinet. The unemployment rate in this region could be more than 95%!

18. The central government of Ethiopia has created several clan-based ‘political parties’ in the Somali region, a privilege that was denied from us to establish our own political parties, which has never happened. These parties are clan-based and intended to divide the Somalis into clans. This is the basic present Ethiopian regime’s attitude towards the Somalis of divide and rule by trying to create problems among the Somali clans through these ‘political parties’. Fortunately, this plan resulted in total failure and the Somalis never ever agreed with their proposals of inter-Somali clan fighting’s.

19. The government is interfering with our religious freedom and rights, and won’t hesitate to tell the Western Nations that these pastoral nomads are fundamentalist in order to get financial aid as well as weapons and thus continue its atrocities against its ‘citizens’, who on the contrary need sympathy, peace, bread, justice and development.

20. People of this region don’t own hotels or shops and hence are not involved in commercial activities, mostly for fear of daylight looting by these Ethiopian bandit soldiers and because of this more than 70% of the people remained to be pastoral nomads. Most of the Somalis in this region do not even know the Ethiopia currency-birr, because they have been trading only with Somalia by using the Somali currency-the shilling.

When we look and analyse the above-cited status and many more, the people of the Somali region are not living in the 21st century, but rather way back in the Stone Ages. I can say without any bias that now this isolated region is the least developed and most impoverished spot on this earth.