27/06/06 (B356-A) La crise en Somalie : les USA refusent de discuter avec les nouveaux Maîtres de Mogadiscio qui veulent instaurer un régime islamique extrêmiste. (En anglais – BBC – Info lecteur)

US ‘will not talk’ to Somali head

The US has said it will not deal with a new Somali leader whose Islamist militia holds much of southern Somalia.

The US has accused Sheikh Hassan Dahir Aweys, who has been named as the head of a new legislative council, of ties to al-Qaeda – a charge he denies.

Mr Aweys has called for Islamic law to be imposed but a BBC correspondent says his colleagues have offered assurances they do not want a Taleban-style state.

The US has said it is willing to work with other leaders allied to Mr Aweys.

A state department spokesman said the US would wait and see how far the collective leadership of the Somali Supreme Islamic Courts Council, to which Mr Aweys belongs, was willing to work with the international community.

Mr Aweys’ Islamist group is to hold talks with the weak interim government next month.

Interim President Abdullahi Yusuf strongly opposes political Islam.

The two groups last week agreed not to fight each other, amid fears of renewed conflict in Somalia, which has not had an effective national government for 15 years.

Stonings

Mr Aweys has said that the new Somali government should impose sharia law.

« Somalia is a Muslim nation and its people are also Muslim, 100% – therefore any government we agree on would be based on the holy Quran and the teachings of our Prophet Muhammad, » Mr Aweys told the AP news agency.

If strictly following my religion and love for Islam makes me a terrorist, then I will accept the designation

He was speaking to the media for the first time since being named as head of the legislative council of the Somali Supreme Islamic Courts Council – the new name for the Union of Islamic Courts.

In the town of Jowhar, controlled by the Islamists, five people have gone on trial accused of serious offences such as rape and murder, for which they could be stoned to death if found guilty.

Stonings and amputations for thieves are not uncommon in areas run by the Islamic courts.

Mr Aweys is seen as being a hardliner, compared to the more moderate Sheikh Sharif Sheikh Ahmed, who has led the group since its took control of the capital, Mogadishu, from an alliance of warlords.

Mr Ahmed is head of a new executive committee and it is not clear which man is more powerful.

Some correspondents speak of a power struggle between the two factions.

Mr Ahmed has said the group does not want political power.

US call

The US fears that a Somalia run by Islamists could be used by Islamic fighters linked to al-Qaeda.

Such fears will be heightened by the apparent promotion of a man who used to lead al-Itihaad al-Islamiya, a group which the US described as « terrorist ».

State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said the US would be troubled if Mr Aweys’ promotion was an indication of the direction the Somali Supreme Islamic Courts Council was heading in.

But Mr Aweys told the AFP news agency he had never killed anybody.

« I am not a terrorist. But if strictly following my religion and love for Islam makes me a terrorist, then I will accept the designation. »

President Yusuf defeated al-Itihaad in the 1990s, chasing it out of the northern region of Puntland, which he used to head.

The US is widely believed to have backed the defeated Mogadishu warlords, as part of its war on terror.

It has neither confirmed nor denied the reports but says it will support those working to prevent « terrorists » from setting up in Somalia.

18/06/06 (B355_A) Les forces armées éthiopiennes auraient franchi la frontière somalienne, selon les autorités islamiques qui ont pris le pouvoir à Mogasdiscio et dans plusieurs villes du pays. (BBC News en Anglais – Info lecteur)

style= »mso-bidi-font-family: Arial; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold; mso-bidi-font-style: italic »>Ethiopia rejects Somalia claims

Somalia’s Islamist leader says 300 Ethiopian soldiers have crossed the troubled state’s border – a claim denied by Ethiopian officials.
Sharif Sheikh Ahmed said Ethiopian soldiers had crossed in the south-west and entered the town of Dollow.

But an Ethiopian official suggested it was the Islamists who were planning an incursion into Ethiopia.

Many Somalis accuse Ethiopia of backing warlords ousted by the Islamist militia from Mogadishu.

Mr Ahmed, leader of the Union of Islamic Courts, accused Ethiopian troops of entering and leaving Somali border towns in recent days.

« They have deployed a lot of soldiers around the border towns, which is why we have been saying that Ethiopia is going to send in troops to Somalia, » he said.

The Union of Islamic Courts gained control of Mogadishu just two weeks ago after months of fierce fighting.

Before that the Somali capital had been controlled by a group of secular warlords.

Dollow is on the road to Baidoa, seat of Somalia’s weak transitional government.

« Ethiopia has not crossed the border, » said Bereket Simon, an Ethiopian minister without portfolio and close ally of Prime Minster Meles Zenawi said.

« So far, the fundamentalists have occupied Baladwayne and are marching toward the Ethiopian border. Ethiopia hopes that they will not cross the border. »

Reports say two of the Somali warlords defeated in the fighting in Mogadishu have fled the country.

Bashir Raghe and Muse Sudi Yalahow, both part of a coalition formed to fight the Islamist militia earlier in the year, are said to have left Mogadishu by boat.

Reports suggested that the two men had boarded a US vessel off the coast of Somalia.

« Bashir Raghe and Muse Sudi took a boat and they were picked up by the US, » a senior aide to the Islamist leadership, Abdulrahman Ali Osman, told Reuters news agency.

« Everybody is running to their houses to take their guns. Bashir Raghe’s house is being looted. »

Setback for US

But a spokesman for the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, Jeff Breslau, said he had no information on the reports about the warlords.

The Union of Islamic Courts want to introduce Sharia law and end lawlessness on the streets.

Their victory in Mogadishu is seen as a major setback for US policy in the region.

The US has neither confirmed nor denied reports it backed the warlords but has said it will stop Somalia becoming a safe haven for terrorists.

Somalia has not had an effective national government for 15 years, during which time it has been fought over by a host of different armed factions.

25/05/06 (B351-B) Les combats continuent en Somalie entre les Groupes sous l’autorité des Chefs de Guerre et les milices islamiques (BBC en Anglais – Info lecteur)

Gun battle breaks Somalia truce
Mohamed Olad Hassan
BBC, Mogadishu

Fighting has flared again in the Somali capital, Mogadishu, with at least six people killed and six others wounded in a gun battle.

The fighting was between militia loyal to the Islamic Courts and the Anti-Terrorism Alliance, a secular grouping of warlords.

The latest upsurge in violence comes despite a truce being agreed between the two groups 10 days ago.

More than 100 people died in eight days of fighting earlier this month.

Somalia has had no effective government since the overthrow of President Siad Barre in 1991.

Many of the dead and wounded were non-combatants caught up in the gunfire around CC neighbourhood in north Mogadishu.

"I saw two dead bodies lying in the street through my window," local resident Hassan Yare, told the BBC.

Grenades

Doctors at Madina and Keysaney Hospitals have also confirmed that six people were killed in the battle.

"We have lost one our men in the battle, and I am sure six of our rival men were killed," Abdi Dalab, a militia commander for Alliance forces said.

There was no independent confirmation of this claim.

Abdi Dalab also accused the Islamists of violating the ceasefire.

The leaders of the Islamic courts could not immediately be reached for a comment on the latest clash.

The clash began at midnight and intensified once daylight arrived, with the two sides using machine guns and rocket propelled grenades.

Both sides have been massing troops into the area since local traditional elders brokered the truce.

Hundreds of residents who had been optimistic that tensions were easing have again begun to flee from their homes around Yaqshid and Kaaraan districts.

Despite requests by the traditional elders, neither side wants to withdraw fully from the area, because both sides believe they have a right to control CC and surrounding areas.

02/05/06 (B348-B) Une grande première ?? Selon une dépêche de la BBC, le Gouvernement hollandais a suspendu une aide de 150 millions de US $ au Gouvernement Kenyan pour excés de corruption. Cet exemple va-t-il faire tâche d’huile ? (En anglais / info lecteur)

_______________________ Note de l’ARDHD
C’est une première mais certainement pas une dernière. De plus en plus la communauté internationale va se lasser de financer en pure perte des Gouvernements qui détournent les aides et qui asservissent leur population.

On peut espérer que la France adopte un jour cette démarche vertueuse et qu’elle finance des gourvernements et/ou des oppositions qui le méritent et qui redistribueront aux peuples, qui eux, en ont véritablement besoin, les aides nécessaires pour leur survie et pour leur développement.

Nous sommes en faveur des aides internationales pour les populations, mais pas des aides qui contribuent à enrichir et à renforcer des régimes dictatoriaux et sanguinaires.
__________________________________ Extrait de la BBC

Dutch halt Kenya aid over graft

The Dutch government has suspended nearly $150m in aid to Kenya because of concerns over corruption.

Dutch Development Co-operation Minister Agnes van Ardenne said her government wanted to see « more tangible results in the fight against corruption in Kenya ».

Kenyan officials said the move was based on a misconception.

The IMF and the World Bank have recently said they were withholding millions of dollars in aid to Kenya because of concerns over corruption.

Analysts said the decision by the Dutch government is a further blow to President Mwai Kibaki, who had appealed for funds for millions of people in need of food aid.

Embezzlement row

The Dutch government said it wanted to see more action before it re-started its 118m euros ($148m) aid programme to Kenya.

The Netherlands will continue to put pressure on the Kenyan government. The Dutch government wants greater clarity in measuring and monitoring corruption. Dutch Minister Agnes van Ardenne

« The reason is that the Kenyan government has not produced enough proof of success in its fight against corruption, » Ms van Ardenne said in a statement.

« The Dutch government is also concerned to see more tangible results, » the minister added.

The suspended aid was aimed at supporting educational and environmental programmes.

President Kibaki was elected in 2002 on a pledge to tackle corruption which plagued previous administrations.

But Kenya has recently been rocked by a major corruption scandal – the so-called Anglo Leasing scam.

Two senior ministers implicated in the alleged $200m embezzlement scheme have resigned. They say they are innocent.

‘Dependency mentality’

Kenyan officials said they were disappointed by the Dutch move, arguing that the government was doing a lot to tackle corruption.

They also pledged to reduce the country’s dependency on foreign aid.

« Dependency has over the years led to the mentality that we can only develop if funded by outsiders, » Kenyan government spokesman Alfred Mutua said.

« The government believes that true development can only be achieved when one is self-dependent and.. works with friends, » the spokesman added.


02/05/06 (B348-B) Une grande première ?? Selon une dépêche de la BBC, le Gouvernement hollandais a suspendu une aide de 150 millions de US $ au Gouvernement Kenyan pour excés de corruption. Cet exemple va-t-il faire tâche d’huile ? (En anglais / info lecteur)

_______________________ Note de l’ARDHD
C’est une première mais certainement pas une dernière. De plus en plus la communauté internationale va se lasser de financer en pure perte des Gouvernements qui détournent les aides et qui asservissent leur population.

On peut espérer que la France adopte un jour cette démarche vertueuse et qu’elle finance des gourvernements et/ou des oppositions qui le méritent et qui redistribueront aux peuples, qui eux, en ont véritablement besoin, les aides nécessaires pour leur survie et pour leur développement.

Nous sommes en faveur des aides internationales pour les populations, mais pas des aides qui contribuent à enrichir et à renforcer des régimes dictatoriaux et sanguinaires.
__________________________________ Extrait de la BBC

Dutch halt Kenya aid over graft

The Dutch government has suspended nearly $150m in aid to Kenya because of concerns over corruption.

Dutch Development Co-operation Minister Agnes van Ardenne said her government wanted to see « more tangible results in the fight against corruption in Kenya ».

Kenyan officials said the move was based on a misconception.

The IMF and the World Bank have recently said they were withholding millions of dollars in aid to Kenya because of concerns over corruption.

Analysts said the decision by the Dutch government is a further blow to President Mwai Kibaki, who had appealed for funds for millions of people in need of food aid.

Embezzlement row

The Dutch government said it wanted to see more action before it re-started its 118m euros ($148m) aid programme to Kenya.

The Netherlands will continue to put pressure on the Kenyan government. The Dutch government wants greater clarity in measuring and monitoring corruption. Dutch Minister Agnes van Ardenne

« The reason is that the Kenyan government has not produced enough proof of success in its fight against corruption, » Ms van Ardenne said in a statement.

« The Dutch government is also concerned to see more tangible results, » the minister added.

The suspended aid was aimed at supporting educational and environmental programmes.

President Kibaki was elected in 2002 on a pledge to tackle corruption which plagued previous administrations.

But Kenya has recently been rocked by a major corruption scandal – the so-called Anglo Leasing scam.

Two senior ministers implicated in the alleged $200m embezzlement scheme have resigned. They say they are innocent.

‘Dependency mentality’

Kenyan officials said they were disappointed by the Dutch move, arguing that the government was doing a lot to tackle corruption.

They also pledged to reduce the country’s dependency on foreign aid.

« Dependency has over the years led to the mentality that we can only develop if funded by outsiders, » Kenyan government spokesman Alfred Mutua said.

« The government believes that true development can only be achieved when one is self-dependent and.. works with friends, » the spokesman added.


13/04/06 (B345-B) La BBC (section somalie) accable Guelleh !

Les témoignages de deux citoyens proches des vicitimes du naufrage du boutre, le lundi soir 10 avril (le jour de la naissance du Prophète Mohamed), sur les ondes de la BBC (section somalie) si longtemps inféodée aux dictatures de l’oncle et du neveu nous laissent rageurs…

Le premier témoignage était celui d’une femme en pleurs ayant perdu son frère et qui s’indignait de l’arrêt effectif des recherches alors que son frère ne figurait ni parmi les morts ni parmi les rescapés blessés, hospitalisés…

Le second témoignage était celui d’un homme, qui se confondait en imprécations contre les autorités qui ont trouvé le moyen de clore les enquêtes et recherches… alors que les éléments de la Force Navale continuent de se promener le long des côtes avec leurs vedettes rapides, qui n’ont que peu servi (bien après) durant les premières heures du naufrage dramatique survenu à quelques dizaines de mètres de leur caserne opérationnelle sise au « Port naval » de l’Escale de Djibouti.

Depuis le début de cette tragédie les Djiboutiens condamnent pleinement et unanimement l’apathie voir l’indifférence des services de secours nationaux constatée durant les premiers instants du drame maritime.

Le premier responsable de ce cafouillage reste selon eux Guelleh (de passage) qui s’est précipité le 6 avril dans les premières minutes sur les lieux du drame sans apporter la moindre solution au grave problème de l’heure, bien au contraire son bataillon la garde présidentielle aurait par sécurité bloqué la circulation. Il s’est lâchement permis de décréter que deux jours de deuil national au lieu de trois à l’issue d’une cellule de crise convoquée trop tard soit 48 heures après la tragédie.

Le Chef de l’Etat devra un jour ou l’autre payer cette haute Trahison nationale.

Le mardi 11 avril les proches du régime attendaient en vain le mot d’ordre du Conseil des Ministres hebdomadaire, pour permettre au grincheux Arnaoud de sortir de son mutisme sur ce drame sans fin avec des disparus inconnus. Non à cette volonté politique d’étouffement de la vérité !

Même aujourd’hui le 12 avril 2006 « la Nation » journal de propagande IOGiène a passé sous silence ce drame national alors que des recherches continuent au Yémen.

06/04/06 (B344-B) BBC : reprise de la déclaration d’Amnesty International au sujet des prisons secrètes. La BBC cite un témoin qui affirme avoir été détenus durant une certaine période à Djibouti, après avoir été arrêté à Daar-es-Salaam. Il aurait été interrogé sous la photo officielle de Guelleh qui était accrochée dans la pièce. !!! (En anglais)

Lien : http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/world/africa/4880320.stm

US ‘used Djibouti’ in rendition Amnesty International has suggested that Djibouti was one of the countries where prisoners allegedly abducted and mistreated by the US were held.

The report, based on interviews with former detainees, also links the US practice of « rendition » to the torture or ill-treatment of terror suspects. Washington has insisted it would never send detainees to places where they would be at risk of torture.

The CIA said it was aware of the report but declined to comment.

The US has a task force based in Djibouti to lead its anti-terror operations across the Horn of Africa.

Detailed testimony Yemeni citizen Muhammad al-Assad said US officials, who said they were from the US Federal Bureau of Investigation had questioned him in Djibouti, according to the Amnesty International report titled « Below the radar: Secret flights to torture and ‘disappearance' ».

He said a picture of the president of Djibouti hung on the wall of the interrogation room.

Mr al-Assad said he spent about two weeks in Djibouti. The report says Mr al-Assad was arrested in Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, on 26 December 2003 and flown out sometime before dawn the next day. « Sources in Tanzania have said that he was flown to Djibouti on a small US plane, » the report states.

From Djibouti, Mr al-Assad was flown to another location, believed to be in Europe. He is one of three Yemenis whose cases are highlighted in the report. The other two are believed to have been he in Afghanistan before being transferred to Europe. The 15,000-word report provides detailed accounts of the experiences of the three men, who claim to have been held in at least four different secret US prisons between October 2003 and May 2005. Descriptions

The men were allegedly held for 13 months at a so-called « black site », a secret facility believed to be run by the CIA, before they were returned to Yemen, Amnesty said. In their statements, they gave detailed descriptions of travel times, changing climates and daylight hours which, although not conclusive, Amnesty says suggests they were held in Djibouti, Afghanistan and somewhere in eastern Europe.

The BBC’s Rob Watson says although the report is highly critical of the US approach to terrorism suspects, it does not contain any suggestion from the three men that they were tortured by their American captors. None of the three men was ever charged with any terrorism-related offence.

The US government has said that the transfer of terror suspects is carried out according to US and international law. However, Amnesty says the CIA is exploiting a loophole that allows private aircraft to land at foreign airports without having to inform local authorities – unlike government or military planes.

The group warned that governments around the world may find themselves « complicit in serious human rights abuses » and urged them to take steps to prevent renditions.

21/02/06 (B338-B) Combats extrêmements meurtriers depuis quatre jours à Mogadiscio entre les chefs de Guerre et des milices islamistes. (BBC en Anglais – Info lecteur)

Somali warlords battle Islamists

Mogadishu is controlled by thousands of gunmen

Clashes are going on for a fourth day in the heaviest fighting seen in the Somali capital for several years.

Supporters of some of the city’s militia leaders have clashed with an armed Islamist group which is trying to establish law and order.

Their opponents say the Islamic courts are terrorising local people. A top cleric says fighting will continue until the other side surrenders.

Many of the at least 15 deaths have been civilians hit by stray bullets.

A witness told AFP news agency on Tuesday that two people had died and 15 were wounded in a clash in southern Mogadishu’s Daynile district.

"The place is full of blood and it is very scary," he said.

Clashes between armed groups have been common in Somalia since former military leader Mohamed Siad Barre was overthrown in 1991. The country has been without a functioning government since then.


Over the weekend, a group of MPs urged both sides to stop fighting.

The fighting pits a new group, the Alliance for the Restoration of Peace and Counter-Terrorism, against the Islamic courts’ militia.

Hundreds of families have fled their homes around the former military academy.

Our correspondent says at least five warlords-cum-ministers in the transitional government are behind the new alliance, which is battling the Islamic courts.

The courts have set up Mogadishu’s only judicial system in parts of the capital but have been accused of links to al-Qaeda.

Their critics accuse the courts of being behind the killing of moderate Muslim scholars.

On 26 February, the country’s parliament is due to meet for the first time on home soil since it was formed in Kenya more than a year ago.